High School (9th - 12th)

ACCOUNTING

Accounting offers an introduction to basic accounting procedures, concepts, and terminology.  It covers beginning entries of a sole-proprietorship through the closing entries of it’s accounting period.  Students will learn the differences between assets, liabilities, owner’s capital, revenues, and expenses.  Also included are debits, credits, and how financial statements are related to and balance with one another.  This is an introductory level course that may benefit students who plan to study accounting in college.

BIBLE

9th GRADE BIBLE

9th grade Bible topics include, but are not limited to the following:  an introduction to the Bible, Paul's writings, Old Testament prophets, the book of John, the second coming of Christ, where are the dead, and ethics and morality.  Prayer is a daily part of this class.

10th GRADE BOYS BIBLE

In 10th grade the boys meet separately from the girls.  This creates a unique high school learning atmosphere.  During the first semester the students learn the history of how we got the Bible and the importance of the Bible in society, religion, and law.  We study the background of the writers, languages, geographic locations, and culture of the Bible along with historical timeline of original texts and translations.  We study the overview of culture and its effects on society and how culture.  We learn the history of the Roman Empire, especially during the first century, and use it as a back ground for the study of the life of Christ, using Matthew as the primary text.

The second semester continues the life of Christ through the death, burial, and resurrection.  We also follow the lives of the apostles and the beginning of the church.  Upon the completion of the life of Christ we begin a study of male leadership using several key characters from the bible.  We look at the lives of men from both the old and new testaments and examine leadership traits that can be applied today.  We also use selected materials from different books such as What Would Jesus Do Today by Rubel Shelley and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens  by Sean Covey.

10th GRADE GIRLS BIBLE

10th Grade Girls Bible is a combination of different studies, which vary each year depending on the spiritual needs of the girls.  The first semester typically consists of a study of the Old and New Testatment women of the Bible.  We look into these women's lives and their experiences, and pull a modern-day application from their mistakes and victories. Once we work through the majority of women mentioned in the Bible, the students choose what will be studied for the remaineder of the year, based on their spiritual needs. Most often they choose to study what the Bible says about issues and struggles that teenage girls deal with on a daily basis.

11th GRADE BIBLE

During the first semester the students review the history of how we got the Bible and the importance of the Bible in society, religion, and law.  We look the background of the writers, languages, geographic locations, and culture of the Bible along with historical timeline of original texts and translations.  We study the overview of culture and its effects on society and how culture.  We learn the history of the Roman Empire, especially during the first century, and use it as a back ground for the study of the Book of Acts.  The Book of Acts is a chapter by chapter text study using the “A.B.C’s” of Acts.  Each chapter is assigned a letter of the alphabet and all major topics in that chapter begin with the assigned letter.  It is a unique memorization tool to help find and locate key information using the alphabet letters and chapter numbers.

The second semester the students does an in-depth study of spiritual warfare.  The study focuses on the spiritual, or unseen, realm, which includes a study of angels and demons.  Included in this study is spiritualism, witchcraft, sorcery, and Wicca.  Students learn Biblical principles about these topics and modern day application.  Students will also do a textual study of the book of James, on of the most practical books in the bible.  This study includes information about the author, first century application and modern day application.

12th GRADE BOYS BIBLE

Senior Boys Bible focuses primarily on the books of Romans and Revelation.  The study of Romans emphasizes salvation by God’s grace through our faith.  The study of Revelation assures the victory of Christ over Satan.  Prayer is a daily part of this class.

12th GRADE GIRLS BIBLE

Senior Girls Bible is a combination of different studies, which vary each year depending on the spiritual needs of the girls.  However, all studies are chosen for the purpose of Biblical application and spiritual transformation.  We pursue an in-depth study of the book of Esther, to prepare and challenge the girls before they enter the world of college. We conclude the year by reading and analyzing  Redeeming Love, a novel based on the book of Hosea.

MISSIONS CLASS (11th grade)

The Missions class is a bible class elective for students in the 11th grade.  The class plans, organizes, fund raises and participates in a mission trip.  The entire year is devoted to the planning of the trip which is taking in the spring of the year.  The class incorporates many other classes the students have been involved in such as Spanish, Chemistry, Biology, English, and of course Bible.  The concept of the class is to teach young people how to use their talents and resources to serve in God’s kingdom.

SERVANT CLASS

The primary goal of servant class is to provide the students an opportunity to model the example of Christ in serving.  The course is made up of various service projects to assist the school, community, and the world.  Students are required to serve out-of-school service hours through whatever avenues and organizations they choose.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS reinforces touch typing and other general computer operations and exposes students to word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software using Microsoft Office.

COMPUTER KEYBOARDING

Keyboarding is a one-semester course designed to develop basic skills in operating a computerized keyboard by introducing keyboard-operating techniques stressing the touch system for learning the alphanumeric/keyboard characters including the keypad.  Students master the keyboard with desirable techniques, develop speed and accuracy, and format basic documents.

ECONOMICS

Economics is an eighteen week study of macro-economics.  This class is a senior level class gives the student a real life perspective of economics in this country as well as the world.  Our focus is how supply and demand work in today’s world.    We look at the personal side of economics and stress the good fundamental habits of saving money and how to plan for the future.

PERSONAL FINANCE

Personal finance is a microeconomic class that looks at economics on a personal level which will help to prepare students set proper financial goals and fiscal responsibility for the real world.  Students are taught to prepare budgets, avoid debt, and given information about the different types of insurance that they will need during their lifetimes.

ENGLISH

ENGLISH I

In the freshman year, we focus on teaching the basics of composition and research while continuing to study grammar, vocabulary, and literature.  Our students are assigned summer reading activities, and we study Animal Farm, The Lord of the Flies, The Odyssey, The House of the Scorpion, and Romeo and Juliet.  We also complete units on short stories, nonfiction, and poetry.  For vocabulary, we focus on Greek roots and vocabulary in the context of literature. Our students learn how to write coherent and unified paragraphs as well as five-paragraph essays on a variety of topics. As an introduction to research, the students will complete a research project that includes the process of finding and documenting good sources.  Our study of grammar includes an in-depth study of the parts of the sentence, verb tenses, phrases, and clauses while addressing usage and mechanics through writing.

HONORS ENGLISH I

In the freshman year, we focus on teaching the basics of composition and research while continuing to study grammar, vocabulary, and literature. Honors classes differ from standard classes in the pace of study, testing methods, and amount of homework.  Our students are assigned summer reading activities, and we study Animal Farm, The Lord of the Flies, The Odyssey, The House of the Scorpion, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream.  We also complete units on short stories, nonfiction, and poetry.  For vocabulary, we focus on Greek roots and vocabulary in the context of literature. Our students learn how to write coherent and unified paragraphs as well as five-paragraph essays on a variety of topics. As an introduction to research, the students will complete a research project that includes the process of finding and documenting good sources.  Our study of grammar includes an in-depth study of the parts of the sentence, verb tenses, phrases, and clauses while addressing usage and mechanics through writing.

ENGLISH II

English II focuses on the study of literature, grammar, and writing. Books, short stories, and poetry covered in the course offer a survey of world literature. Grammar instruction includes a review of the basics along with a targeted study of phrases, clauses, and punctuation. The study of grammar and literature is integrated into the writing curriculum, which includes persuasive, comparison-contrast, cause and effect, and poetry explication essays. The focus of the English II research paper is an examination of a social issue in both real life and in one selection of literature.

HONORS ENGLISH II

English II focuses on the study of literature, grammar, and writing. Books, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction covered in the course offer a survey of world literature. Grammar instruction includes a review of the basics along with a targeted study of phrases, clauses, agreement, and punctuation. The study of grammar and literature is integrated into the writing curriculum, which includes persuasive, comparison-contrast, cause and effect, and poetry explication essays. The focus of the Honors English II research paper is an examination of a social issue in both real life and in two selections of literature.

ENGLISH III/HONORS ENGLISH III

The focus of junior English is mainly writing and American Literature.  The writing includes emphasis on perfecting the five-paragraph essay with the use of topic sentences, a thesis, transitions, introductions and conclusions.  The students will also be introduced to their first full research paper with in-text citations as well as a works cited page. Grammar is taught through writing and the Harbrace handbook. The students will read several American classics including The Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, At Fault, and The Crucible. There will also be a number of American poets as well as American short story writers studied.  The class is centered on establishing critical thinking skills and creative abilities.

The Honors English class utilizes the same texts, and additional outside texts, to engage in more independent work.

ENGLISH IV

This class is taught as two separate classes, British Literature on M/W/F, and Grammar and Composition on T/Th.  In British Literature, students will be introduced in a survey course to the greatest writings from the Anglo-Saxon times to the present.  We cover books, plays, short stories, poetry, and essays from the best British writers including Chaucer, Shakespeare, Keats, Tennyson, Coleridge, Shelley, and many others.  Students will develop an appreciation for the connection between writing in any period and the social, political, scientific, and religious climate at that time.  Critical thinking will be honed as students do homework that requires their introspective reactions to the day’s reading, and vocabulary tests will enhance the students’ language and reading skills.  In the Grammar and Comp section of the class, students will write numerous papers and master Harbrace correcting and editing to become better writers.

HONORS LIT IV

This class has the same basic format as the English IV class, but there are additional features like an etymology unit with a presentation and more in-depth looks at the works being studied.

ENGLISH 101 - DUAL ENROLLMENT

This dual-enrollment with Cumberland University course is an expository writing class that demonstrates to the student that writing is a process—not a one-time event.  As the semester progresses, students will write six different types of essays including narrative, argumentative, description, comparison/contrast, literary, and process.  This is a portfolio class, so student writers will be assembling a writing portfolio that will be turned in at the end of the semester.  Students will learn grammar mastery and supreme organizational skills that will prepare them for other college classes in the future.

FINE ARTS

ART

Art is designed using the principles of Discipline-Based Arts Education. This educational approach is an integration of art production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. Students develop skills in various art techniques including 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional mediums, as well as utilizing the elements and principles of art.

GENERAL MUSIC

This course is a comprehensive study that offers students the opportunities to create, perform, listen to and analyze music. This course surveys music from diverse cultures around the world.  It is an active study of how music says who we are and how we express ourselves through music.  Social, cultural and historical contexts of music in our lives are studied.

PIANO/GUITAR

This course is a unique introductory study that is designed to help the student learn different styles and techniques of guitar and piano playing.  The basic playing skills for both instruments are presented and opportunities are given for both solo and ensemble playing.  The students learn basic music theory as it relates to the piano and guitar.  Upon completion of this course, the students will have a strong grasp of playing skills, repertoire and musical styles for both instruments.

FOREIGN LANGAUGE

GREEK I

An introductory study of the fundamentals of Koine Greek. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the ability to translate and exegete the Greek New Testament.   The goal of this course is the acquiring of a limited skill in reading New Testament Greek (by an inductive method), as a basis for exegesis and interpretation of the New Testament in the original language.

SPANISH I

Spanish I is the study of the Spanish language and the cultures it represents.  This class includes the foundations of the Spanish language, along with the development of four abilities needed in a foreign language class:  reading, listening, writing, and speaking.  The content covers grammar, culture, reading, and writing strategies.

SPANISH II

Spanish II is a step forward in the process of learning a different language.  Foundations are not fully developed in Spanish I, therefore this class enables students to acquire a deeper and broader knowledge of the language and it's cultural issues.

GOVERNMENT

This class is an eighteen week study of the U.S. federal government.  We analyze  the functions of the government, how it works,  the functions of the three branches, and how it works with and for the people.   We study landmark Supreme Court cases and evaluatge the effectiveness of the electoral college.  This class is taken by seniors to help them better understand the workings of government and understand their role as citizens.

DUAL ENROLLMENT U.S. HISTORY

This dual enrollment course is offered through Cumberland University.  The first semester involves the study of U.S. History from the discovery of America until 1876.  The second semester involves U.S. History from 1876 until the present time.

U.S. PRESIDENTS

This class is designed to give a better understanding of the executive branch of government.  This is a senior level class that studies the history of the creation of the Presidency and the powers that the Founding Fathers gave to the President.  Students will learn how the electoral college works and the powers, stated and implied, which the President possesses.  We also study each President in depth to gain an understanding of the impact each one had on history.

WORLD GEOGRAPHY

World geography is the study of the physical and human features of the earth.  Students apply the five themes of geography (location, place, region, movement, and human-environmental interaction) to each unit of study.  In order to ensure that Friendship students have a broad knowledge of the world, high school geography builds on their knowledge base from 7th grade.  Since 7th grade geography focuses on the Western Hemisphere, high school geography students study the countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.  Upon completion of freshman geography, a student would have studied all of the countries of the world.  A variety of maps, graphs, charts, diagrams, and other geographer’s tools are used in gathering information.  As part of the class requirements, students must read and summarize current event articles on world affairs and present these to their peers.

JOURNALISM I and II

Journalism is an elective offered to juniors and seniors. Students learn how to run a publishing business that produces the high school’s yearbook and newspaper.  Instruction includes the study of photography, marketing, graphic design, news writing, and editing basics. Second year students are eligible for management positions.

MATHEMATICS

ALGEBRA I (8th or 9th Grade)

The Algebra I class combines existing math skills with abstract thinking to solve various problems. The class is designed to broaden the student's general math skills and prepare them for high mathematics in high school. Students will study mathematical principles regarding exponents, polynomials, systems of equations, graphing linear equations and inequalities, rational numbers, radicals, functions, and quadratic equations.

ALGEBRA II

Algebra II is the study of solving systems of equations and inequalities, linear and quadratic functions and inequalities. Students will review concepts of real numbers and be introduced to imaginary numbers.  It is also a study of matrices, polynomials, rational expressions and equations, and rectangular coordinates.

HONORS ALGEBRA II

Honors Algebra II is the study of solving systems of equations and inequalities, linear and quadratic functions and inequalities.  The students will review the concepts of real numbers and be introduced to imaginary numbers.  It is also a study of matrices, polynomials, rational expressions and equations.  The more advanced students will also be introduced to conic, exponential and logarithmic relations, and probability concepts.

ADVANCED MATH

Advanced Math is a course designed to be taken after Algebra II. Students will review algebra skills such as solving equations and inequalities and working with polynomials. They will also prepare for the ACT and SAT tests by learning about logarithms, statistics, and trigonometry.

GEOMETRY

Geometry is a course designed to be taken after Algebra I.  Students will use logic and algebraic skills to solve problems involving parallel lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles.  Surface area and volume on three-dimensional objects will also be calculated.

HONORS GEOMETRY

Honors geometry is a course designed to be taken after Algebra I Honors.  Students will use logic and algebraic skills to solve problems involving parallel lines, similar polygons, triangles, circles, area, and volume.  Constructions and transformations will be interspersed throughout the year.  In Honors Geometry, more detailed proofs, higher level algebra problems, and projects will be included.

PRECALCULUS

Precalculus is an advanced mathematics course that uses meaningful problems and appropriate technologies to build upon previously learned mathematical concepts to develop the underpinnings of calculus.  Topics covered will include but not limited to algebraic functions, trig functions, sequences and series, and probability and statistics.  The topics covered will help in preparation for the ACT and college.

SCIENCE

ANATOMY and PHYSIOLOGY

Anatomy relates to the structure of the human body.  The student will learn the location and description of all the bones, many of the muscles, and most of the various organs of the human body.  Physiology deals with the function of such systems.  The students go into to detail about the structure and function of the various systems of the human body.

BIOLOGY

Biology is the study of life.  Students learn life processes beginning at the cellular level.  The class emphasizes in the study of ecology and genetics as applied to living organisms.  Students will research and collect specimens as they learn of the living world.

HONORS BIOLOGY

Biology is the study of life.  Students learn life processes beginning at the cellular level.  The class emphasizes in the study of ecology and genetics as applied to living organisms.  The students are challenged to apply principles of biology to more current events and other subject matter.  In Honors Biology the students complete multiple research and collection type projects as they come to a greater understanding of the living world in which they live.

CHEMISTRY  I

This course provides a lab experience and covers introductory chemistry concepts such as matter; atomic theory; electron configuration; periodic law; and chemical bonding, formulas, equations, and reactions. In addition to these fundamental chemical principles, the development of critical thinking skills is emphasized.

HONORS CHEMISTRY I

This course covers the same fundamental chemistry concepts as Regular Chemistry, but in a more exhaustive fashion. The development of independent learning skills is emphasized and introductory lab experiences are provided. Coursework requires Honors Math skills, organizational abilities, abstract thinking skills, and written communication skills. A teacher recommendation is required.

HONORS CHEMISTRY II

This course builds on the foundation laid in first-year chemistry. The following topics are explored: gas laws; properties and behaviors of liquids and solids; solutions and colligative properties; acids and bases; titrations; reaction kinetics; chemical equilibrium; oxidation-reduction reactions; and organic compounds. Independent learning and increased development of lab skills are emphasized. Honors Chemistry is a prerequisite.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AP

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with the problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.  Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a waide variety of topics from different areas of study.  Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included in the study of environmental science. The course covers a variety of topics regarding environmental issues and concerns.  Responsible stewardship of the gifts God has given will be a constant emphasis.  An in-depth study of water ecology and water quality will be intergrated throughout the year.

PHYSICS

Physics is a course dealing with the relationshpi between matter and energy.  The areas of mechanics, thermodynamcis, waves and sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics will be investigated by various means including individual and group projects.

PSYCHOLOGY

This is an introduction to psychology that allows students hands-on opportunities to explore the inner workings of the brain.  We study early psychology pioneers and their theories, and we look at experimentation techniques of the past and compare them to the practices of today.  This course includes a unit on abnormal psychology (including looking at the mind of a serial killer) and ends with a unit on the Christian perspective of death and dying.  We view documentaries on autism and other disorders, and students often do group work over case studies.

SPEECH

The focus of senior high speech is the ability to speak and present information to groups of people.  The students focus on learning persuasive speeches, informative speeches, expository speeches, and narrative speeches.  The students also learn to communicate verbally and non-verbally through hand gestures and body language.  The students will learn to work in groups and present speeches with their peers.  The students will use appropriate language based on the audience being addressed.